Recipes - Japanese

Chashu (Pork Belly)
Chashu


Despite its humble list of ingredients, this slow-braised marinated pork belly recipe delivers a tender, melt-in-your mouth goodness, making it an ideal addition for your Tonkotsu Ramen
Cooking Time: 60mins - 120mins
Serves:5 to 8
Total time: 60mins - 120mins
Course: Main
Cook Method: Pan-Fry
Cuisine: Japanese









Ingredients:

350g pork belly block
1 tsp salt
½ tbsp neutral flavour oil (vegetable, canola, etc.)
2in ginger (sliced)
1 Tokyo negi (or leaks/green onions)

Seasonings

⅔ cup water
⅓ cup sake
⅓ cup soy sauce
3 tbsp granulated sugar




Steps:
  1. Gather all the ingredients.
  2. Cut the spring onion into 5cm lengths and separate its green parts from the white parts. For the white parts, make a lengthwise incision and remove its soft green core. Keep it with the green part, which will be used later on for cooking.
  3. Stack up the white parts of the spring onion and slice thinly. Soak in cold water for 10 mins and drain well. Put it in an air-tight container, or cover it with a plastic wrap. We will use this for garnishing chashu later.
  4. Peel and slice ginger.
  5. Sprinkle and rub the salt on the pork belly. If your pork belly block is big, you have two options. Cut into smaller pieces, or roll it into a log with butcher’s twine, keeping the thick fat on the outside. Start tying from the centre of the log toward the left and right.
  6. Heat the oil in a cast iron skillet (or regular frying pan) over high heat and brown the fat side first, then flip it over to brown the other side. Each side would take about 10 mins to brown (duration depends on the level of heat).
  7. While browning put all the ingredients for the seasoning in a heavy-bottom pot (or regular pot). Place the pork belly in the pot, add ginger and spring onions, and bring it to a boil. Boil on low heat for approximately 30 mins until pork is slightly tender. Cover the top of the meat with aluminium foil shaped to fit the diameter of the pot. Pierce the foil with chopsticks to release steam.
  8. Lower the heat to medium-low and simmer, occasionally turning the pork belly, for about one hour or until there is ¼ in of liquid left in the pot.
  9. Remove aluminium foil and remove the sauce until you can see the bottom of the pot when you scrape the sauce. Stay in the kitchen as the meat can easily get burnt if there is no liquid left. After 15-20 mins or so, bubbles will start to appear. You are getting close to the end. Turn off the heat when you are able to see the bottom of the pot when you slide the meat around. The sauce is now thickened and the meat is shiny.
  10. Take out the meat and cut into thin slices.
  11. Transfer to a serving plate and garnish with chopped spring onions, or serve with ramen.
  12. If you don’t use the chashu right away, pack the chashu and the sauce in an air-tight plastic bag to give it more flavour all around. You can store it in the refrigerator up to 5 days, or 3 weeks in the freezer.

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Chashu (Pork Belly)

Chashu (Pork Belly)

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Despite its humble list of ingredients, this slow-braised marinated pork belly recipe delivers a tender, melt-in-your mouth goodness, making it an ideal addition for your Tonkotsu Ramen

Cooking Time: 60mins - 120mins
Serves: 5 to 8
Total time: 60mins - 120mins
Course: Main
Cook Method: Pan-Fry
Cuisine: Japanese
Ingredients

350g pork belly block
1 tsp salt
½ tbsp neutral flavour oil (vegetable, canola, etc.)
2in ginger (sliced)
1 Tokyo negi (or leaks/green onions)

Seasonings

⅔ cup water
⅓ cup sake
⅓ cup soy sauce
3 tbsp granulated sugar

Instructions
  1. Gather all the ingredients.
  2. Cut the spring onion into 5cm lengths and separate its green parts from the white parts. For the white parts, make a lengthwise incision and remove its soft green core. Keep it with the green part, which will be used later on for cooking.
  3. Stack up the white parts of the spring onion and slice thinly. Soak in cold water for 10 mins and drain well. Put it in an air-tight container, or cover it with a plastic wrap. We will use this for garnishing chashu later.
  4. Peel and slice ginger.
  5. Sprinkle and rub the salt on the pork belly. If your pork belly block is big, you have two options. Cut into smaller pieces, or roll it into a log with butcher’s twine, keeping the thick fat on the outside. Start tying from the centre of the log toward the left and right.
  6. Heat the oil in a cast iron skillet (or regular frying pan) over high heat and brown the fat side first, then flip it over to brown the other side. Each side would take about 10 mins to brown (duration depends on the level of heat).
  7. While browning put all the ingredients for the seasoning in a heavy-bottom pot (or regular pot). Place the pork belly in the pot, add ginger and spring onions, and bring it to a boil. Boil on low heat for approximately 30 mins until pork is slightly tender. Cover the top of the meat with aluminium foil shaped to fit the diameter of the pot. Pierce the foil with chopsticks to release steam.
  8. Lower the heat to medium-low and simmer, occasionally turning the pork belly, for about one hour or until there is ¼ in of liquid left in the pot.
  9. Remove aluminium foil and remove the sauce until you can see the bottom of the pot when you scrape the sauce. Stay in the kitchen as the meat can easily get burnt if there is no liquid left. After 15-20 mins or so, bubbles will start to appear. You are getting close to the end. Turn off the heat when you are able to see the bottom of the pot when you slide the meat around. The sauce is now thickened and the meat is shiny.
  10. Take out the meat and cut into thin slices.
  11. Transfer to a serving plate and garnish with chopped spring onions, or serve with ramen.
  12. If you don’t use the chashu right away, pack the chashu and the sauce in an air-tight plastic bag to give it more flavour all around. You can store it in the refrigerator up to 5 days, or 3 weeks in the freezer.

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