Culture - Malaysian and Singaporean

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 36224 [post_author] => 5243 [post_date] => 2016-02-08 09:30:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-02-07 22:30:32 [post_content] =>

Chinese Lunar New Year is a festival that embraces many Asian cultures. Even the food reflects diversity in its cuisine. The tradition of eating Yu Sheng (also known as Yee Sang, Lou Sang, Lou Hei) was started by the Cantonese living in Malaysia. Now it is a widely practised custom in Southeast Asia except for a few countries.

What is Yu Sheng?

Yu Sheng is a big salad bowl mainly comprising of raw fish and is eaten on the 7th day of the Chinese New Year which is a tradition that is unique to Malaysia and Singapore. It is usually served as an appetizer along with all the Chinese New Year food.

Origin of Yu Sheng (Yee Sang)

It is said to have originated along the coast of Guangzhou in Southern China. A Cantonese tradition, and was eaten only on the 7th day of the Chinese Lunar New Year which marks mankind’s birthday known as  Ren Ri. This tradition was brought into Malaysia by the Chinese immigrants, where it was mainly practised in central Peninsular Malaysia. Modern Yu Sheng is purely a Malaysian creation. It is very different from its original version, including the ingredients used and how the food is served. Eating Yu Sheng during Chinese Lunar New Year is a cultural activity for Chinese living in Malaysia, but not so much in other Chinese-populated countries such as Hong Kong, where the practice is almost unheard of.

So why is Yu Sheng considered Lucky?

The combination of all the ingredients in a big bowl and everyone at the table tossing the salad simultaneously using a pair of chopsticks while wishing lucky words are believed to usher in good luck on the 7th day of the new year. Wishing for good fortune during the 7th day of the 15 special days of Chinese New Year is one of the traditional customs still practised in Malaysia. Yu Sheng

Ingredients

The Yu Sheng is served on a large plate with a colourful array of ingredients which includes raw fish,  shredded green and white radish, shredded carrots, pickled ginger, crushed nuts, and pomelo. The ingredients are topped with various condiments like deep-fried flour crisps, crushed peanuts, sesame seeds, cinnamon, pepper, and other spices. People will jointly toss the salad with a generous portion of plum sauce and cooking oil to add sweetness and taste while say Chinese phrases that will bring in good luck, prosperity, and wealth.

The tradition of tossing Yu Sheng is popular mainly in Malaysia & Singapore, however, it is not so as widely practised in other Asian countries such as Korea, Japan, and Vietnam as they have their own traditional dishes that are consumed on Chinese Lunar New Year. [post_title] => What is Yu Sheng and Why is it Considered Lucky? [post_excerpt] => The combining of all the ingredients in a big bowl and everyone at the table tossing the salad simultaneously using a pair of chopsticks and saying lucky words is known to bring good luck on the 7th day of the new year. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => why-is-yu-sheng-considered-lucky [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-03-05 21:00:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-03-05 10:00:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=36224 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

What is Yu Sheng and Why is it Considered Lucky?

Chinese Lunar New Year is a festival that embraces many Asian cultures. Even the food reflects diversity in its cuisine. The tradition of eating Yu Sheng (also known as Yee Sang, Lou Sang, Lou Hei) was started by the Cantonese living in Malaysia. Now it is a widely practised custom in Southeast Asia except for a few countries.

What is Yu Sheng?

Yu Sheng is a big salad bowl mainly comprising of raw fish and is eaten on the 7th day of the Chinese New Year which is a tradition that is unique to Malaysia and Singapore.

It is usually served as an appetizer along with all the Chinese New Year food.

Origin of Yu Sheng (Yee Sang)

It is said to have originated along the coast of Guangzhou in Southern China. A Cantonese tradition, and was eaten only on the 7th day of the Chinese Lunar New Year which marks mankind’s birthday known as  Ren Ri. This tradition was brought into Malaysia by the Chinese immigrants, where it was mainly practised in central Peninsular Malaysia.

Modern Yu Sheng is purely a Malaysian creation. It is very different from its original version, including the ingredients used and how the food is served. Eating Yu Sheng during Chinese Lunar New Year is a cultural activity for Chinese living in Malaysia, but not so much in other Chinese-populated countries such as Hong Kong, where the practice is almost unheard of.

So why is Yu Sheng considered Lucky?

The combination of all the ingredients in a big bowl and everyone at the table tossing the salad simultaneously using a pair of chopsticks while wishing lucky words are believed to usher in good luck on the 7th day of the new year. Wishing for good fortune during the 7th day of the 15 special days of Chinese New Year is one of the traditional customs still practised in Malaysia.

Yu Sheng

Ingredients

The Yu Sheng is served on a large plate with a colourful array of ingredients which includes raw fish,  shredded green and white radish, shredded carrots, pickled ginger, crushed nuts, and pomelo. The ingredients are topped with various condiments like deep-fried flour crisps, crushed peanuts, sesame seeds, cinnamon, pepper, and other spices.

People will jointly toss the salad with a generous portion of plum sauce and cooking oil to add sweetness and taste while say Chinese phrases that will bring in good luck, prosperity, and wealth.



The tradition of tossing Yu Sheng is popular mainly in Malaysia & Singapore, however, it is not so as widely practised in other Asian countries such as Korea, Japan, and Vietnam as they have their own traditional dishes that are consumed on Chinese Lunar New Year.

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