Culture - Chinese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 38201 [post_author] => 1006 [post_date] => 2015-09-17 06:30:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-09-16 20:30:40 [post_content] =>

Among the numerous other Moon festival elements that is said to usher in good luck and prosperity, the water caltrop is one of them.

The name sounds strange and it looks stranger too but the symbolism behind this element is something intriguing. Water caltrop is also known as the buffalo nut or the bat nut.

Upon first glance, the water caltrop gives you an impression that it looks like a bat or more so like a ninja warrior’s weapon. But these nuts are just like water chestnuts born out of an aquatic plant similar to that of a water lily that has been cultivated and eaten in different countries for centuries.

Water caltrops come to season around the time of the Chinese Mid- Autumn Festival and are an important part of traditional festivities.

Water Caltrops - Moon Festival Element

Image: watashiwani used under the Creative Commons Licence

So whats the connection between a water caltrop and Moon festival?

The fact that they look like bats is considered lucky for the Chinese because the Chinese word for bat has a "fu" script in it, which is the word for luck. Hence, water caltrops are said to bring loads of good luck when eaten during the Moon festival.

Water caltrops are cooked until they turn soft and once they are boiled, the nuts are broken and the white flesh is eaten which tastes sweetish (like a combination of roasted chestnut and cooked potato). It has a mild taste with a crumbly texture.

Water caltrops are believed to be sold as street snacks in Taiwan and the kids are more fascinated with it since it looks like a Ninja warrior’s weapon.

Eating them is one of the major activities for children during the Moon festival.

[post_title] => Moon Festival Foods - Water Caltrops [post_excerpt] => Among the numerous other Moon festival elements that usher in good luck and prosperity, Water caltrops is one of them. It is also known as the buffalo nut or the bat nut. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => water-caltrops-moon-festival-elements [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-28 16:14:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-28 05:14:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=38201 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Moon Festival Foods – Water Caltrops

Among the numerous other Moon festival elements that is said to usher in good luck and prosperity, the water caltrop is one of them.

The name sounds strange and it looks stranger too but the symbolism behind this element is something intriguing. Water caltrop is also known as the buffalo nut or the bat nut.

Upon first glance, the water caltrop gives you an impression that it looks like a bat or more so like a ninja warrior’s weapon. But these nuts are just like water chestnuts born out of an aquatic plant similar to that of a water lily that has been cultivated and eaten in different countries for centuries.

Water caltrops come to season around the time of the Chinese Mid- Autumn Festival and are an important part of traditional festivities.

Water Caltrops - Moon Festival Element

Image: watashiwani used under the Creative Commons Licence

So whats the connection between a water caltrop and Moon festival?

The fact that they look like bats is considered lucky for the Chinese because the Chinese word for bat has a “fu” script in it, which is the word for luck. Hence, water caltrops are said to bring loads of good luck when eaten during the Moon festival.

Water caltrops are cooked until they turn soft and once they are boiled, the nuts are broken and the white flesh is eaten which tastes sweetish (like a combination of roasted chestnut and cooked potato). It has a mild taste with a crumbly texture.

Water caltrops are believed to be sold as street snacks in Taiwan and the kids are more fascinated with it since it looks like a Ninja warrior’s weapon.

Eating them is one of the major activities for children during the Moon festival.

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