Culture - Malaysian and Singaporean

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18535 [post_author] => 145 [post_date] => 2014-09-27 14:09:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-09-27 08:39:45 [post_content] => Malaysian cuisine is a direct reflection of the diverse ethnicities that have been part of the country's history. The population in Malaysia is largely comprised of three main ethnic backgrounds – Malays, Chinese, and Indians – and hence the food is heavily influenced by their culture. Let's have a closer look into understanding Malay cuisine.

Understanding Malay CuisineImage: Nicholas Ng used under the Creative Commons Licence

Nasi Goreng, beef rendang, and satay are the most popular dishes from Malaysia, but that’s far from all that this beautiful country has to offer. In a traditional Malay meal, rice is the main staple. Everything else serves as an accompaniment and side. The sambal is a quintessential accompaniment to every Malay meal. The sweets and desserts are varied but they have one common ingredient – plenty of coconut milk. This is true of the cuisine in most Asian cultures. Getting vegetarian food in Malaysia is not too difficult because a significant portion of the population practices vegetarianism. However, finding a 100% vegetarian meal can be a challenge at some places as shrimp paste – or other seafood-based paste – inadvertently make their way into most recipes. However, upon request, most restaurants might present you with an all-vegetarian dish based on their menu. A multicultural country in every sense, Malaysia has, over the years, adapted cuisines from across cultures, tweaked it and made it its own. Consistencies, key ingredients and spice levels have been adjusted to suit the Malaysians' taste, and this has resulted in diverse recipes and flavours. [post_title] => Understanding Malay Cuisine [post_excerpt] => Malaysian cuisine is diverse and unique in its own way. Learn more here. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => understanding-malay-cuisine [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-03 10:09:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-02 23:09:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=culture&p=18535 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Understanding Malay Cuisine

Malaysian cuisine is a direct reflection of the diverse ethnicities that have been part of the country’s history. The population in Malaysia is largely comprised of three main ethnic backgrounds – Malays, Chinese, and Indians – and hence the food is heavily influenced by their culture. Let’s have a closer look into understanding Malay cuisine.

Understanding Malay CuisineImage: Nicholas Ng used under the Creative Commons Licence

Nasi Goreng, beef rendang, and satay are the most popular dishes from Malaysia, but that’s far from all that this beautiful country has to offer.

In a traditional Malay meal, rice is the main staple. Everything else serves as an accompaniment and side. The sambal is a quintessential accompaniment to every Malay meal.

The sweets and desserts are varied but they have one common ingredient – plenty of coconut milk. This is true of the cuisine in most Asian cultures.

Getting vegetarian food in Malaysia is not too difficult because a significant portion of the population practices vegetarianism. However, finding a 100% vegetarian meal can be a challenge at some places as shrimp paste – or other seafood-based paste – inadvertently make their way into most recipes. However, upon request, most restaurants might present you with an all-vegetarian dish based on their menu.

A multicultural country in every sense, Malaysia has, over the years, adapted cuisines from across cultures, tweaked it and made it its own. Consistencies, key ingredients and spice levels have been adjusted to suit the Malaysians’ taste, and this has resulted in diverse recipes and flavours.

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