Culture

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 50511 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-09-15 11:50:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-15 01:50:11 [post_content] => Celebrate the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival by indulging in the signature treat of the festival: mooncakes. These delectable cakes are a must-have on your Moon Festival menu. Learn how to make your own traditional mooncake, or pick up a box from your local Asian bakery or grocery store. Traditional Mooncake Traditional fillings Choose from a range of authentic mooncake fillings, spanning different regions and price points.
  • Lotus seed paste – smooth and delicately sweet, creamy lotus seed paste makes a luxurious filling for mooncakes.
  • Bean paste – sweetened red, black or mung bean pastes are another popular option for traditional mooncakes.
  • Jujubes – this sweet paste made from dates is dark red in colour and has a unique flavour that is at once smoky, sour and fruity.
  • Salted duck egg yolks – said to symbolise the full moon, these golden orbs are often added to the centre of the mooncake. They are particularly prevalent in Cantonese-style mooncakes, along with other savoury elements such as ham, chicken, duck and mushrooms.
  • Smashed nuts ­– a combination of five different nuts and kernels that varies across regions, but may include walnuts, peanuts and almonds, plus pumpkin, watermelon and sesame seeds.
  • Pork – in the Suzhou province, order piping-hot mooncakes with flaky pastry and a minced pork filling.
Pastry Mooncakes typically get their golden pastry from the addition of lard (though vegetarian versions using oil are readily available). Take your pick of three different textures found across Asia.
  • Chewy – preferred by the Cantonese, these pastries are enhanced with a thick sugar syrup for their signature chewy texture.
  • Flaky – popular in Taiwan, the flaky-pastry mooncakes are made by rolling layers of oil-slicked dough with flour, similar to making puff pastry.
  • Tender – somewhere in the middle sits the ‘tender’ style of mooncake, which boast a shortcrust-style pastry.
For more on the Moon Festival, discover the customs of the Mid-Autumn Festival in China, Vietnam and Japan, or try the Asian Inspirations’ recommended dishes – Tofu Patty with Oroshi Ponzu, Moo Sam Chun Tom Khem (Slow-cooked Pork Belly), Malaysian Satay Beef, Japchae, Pan-fried Garlic Prawns, and Pad Cha Beef). To find out more about Moon Festival celebrations and traditions all over Asia, click here. [post_title] => Traditional Mooncakes for the Moon Festival [post_excerpt] => Celebrate the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival next week by indulging in mooncakes. These delectable cakes are a must-have on your Moon Festival menu. Learn how to make your own mooncakes in 10 simple steps, or buy traditional mooncakes from your local Asian bakery or cake store. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => traditional-mooncakes-for-the-moon-festival [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-05 17:17:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-05 06:17:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=50511 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Traditional Mooncakes for the Moon Festival

Celebrate the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival by indulging in the signature treat of the festival: mooncakes. These delectable cakes are a must-have on your Moon Festival menu. Learn how to make your own traditional mooncake, or pick up a box from your local Asian bakery or grocery store.

Traditional Mooncake

Traditional fillings

Choose from a range of authentic mooncake fillings, spanning different regions and price points.

  • Lotus seed paste – smooth and delicately sweet, creamy lotus seed paste makes a luxurious filling for mooncakes.
  • Bean paste – sweetened red, black or mung bean pastes are another popular option for traditional mooncakes.
  • Jujubes – this sweet paste made from dates is dark red in colour and has a unique flavour that is at once smoky, sour and fruity.
  • Salted duck egg yolks – said to symbolise the full moon, these golden orbs are often added to the centre of the mooncake. They are particularly prevalent in Cantonese-style mooncakes, along with other savoury elements such as ham, chicken, duck and mushrooms.
  • Smashed nuts ­– a combination of five different nuts and kernels that varies across regions, but may include walnuts, peanuts and almonds, plus pumpkin, watermelon and sesame seeds.
  • Pork – in the Suzhou province, order piping-hot mooncakes with flaky pastry and a minced pork filling.

Pastry

Mooncakes typically get their golden pastry from the addition of lard (though vegetarian versions using oil are readily available). Take your pick of three different textures found across Asia.

  • Chewy – preferred by the Cantonese, these pastries are enhanced with a thick sugar syrup for their signature chewy texture.
  • Flaky – popular in Taiwan, the flaky-pastry mooncakes are made by rolling layers of oil-slicked dough with flour, similar to making puff pastry.
  • Tender – somewhere in the middle sits the ‘tender’ style of mooncake, which boast a shortcrust-style pastry.

For more on the Moon Festival, discover the customs of the Mid-Autumn Festival in China, Vietnam and Japan, or try the Asian Inspirations’ recommended dishes – Tofu Patty with Oroshi Ponzu, Moo Sam Chun Tom Khem (Slow-cooked Pork Belly), Malaysian Satay Beef, Japchae, Pan-fried Garlic Prawns, and Pad Cha Beef). To find out more about Moon Festival celebrations and traditions all over Asia, click here.

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