Culture - Japanese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 22599 [post_author] => 569 [post_date] => 2014-12-17 11:30:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-12-17 06:00:22 [post_content] => Every culture has its own practices, its own beliefs, its own folklore, and its own traditional clothing. Despite its rapid modernisation, Japan has preserved much of its own traditions, and still uphold the importance of holding on to them in order to preserve its unique Asian culture and heritage. Japanese clothing forms a great part of Asian culture. While most items of clothing are greatly influenced by the time and age during which they were invented, some others keep up with the times and have evolved greatly with the passing of the age. Some others are worn only on special occasions. Let’s take a closer look at the most traditional Japanese men’s attire.

Hoari

Haori - Traditional Japanese Mens Attire

Image: discopalace used under the Creative Commons Licence

Though bereft of elaborate patterns, the hoari is a jacket that has the same shape as the traditional Japanese kimono, but it is actually half its length. Men wear this garment on top of the much longer kimono. What’s unique about the hoari is that it does not overlap at the front portion like a kimono; it is worn slightly open.

Himo

Himo - Traditional Japanese Mens Attire

Courtesy of Royalty Free Google Images

This is an accessory rather than a garment. It resembles a belt that is popular in western clothing and is worn with the haori. It may come with patterned linings, including tea ceremony items, processions, lucky charms, and landscape scenes.

Obi

Obi - Traditional Japanese Mens Attire

Image:  sebastian used under the Creative Commons Licence

The obi is a garment that is used to fasten a kimono. There are specific instructions followed when tying an obi into a traditional clam knot. This particular knot is ideal for women for their yukata kimono. The traditional position of the knot is at the back of the kimono, and it is important to follow the right way on how to make this type of knot.

Hakama

Hakama - Japanese clothing forms

Image:  Last used under the Creative Commons Licence

This garment may be undivided as a skirt (andon) or as a typical pair of trousers (umanori). In most cases, the hakama is worn by people who engage in martial arts including aikido, iaido, naginata, and kendo. Hakamas also have pleats, a padded portion at the lower back part of the wearer (koshita), and a himo or long fabric tied at the waist.

Happi and Hanten

happi Japanese clothing forms

Image: Nemo's great uncle used under the Creative Commons Licence

These garments are made of cotton and come with simple shapes without the typical intricate style of kimono sleeves. The happi coat is worn by men during festivals while hanten jackets are usually worn by tradesmen. [post_title] => Traditional Japanese Men’s Attire [post_excerpt] => A closer look at the most traditional Japanese men’s attire. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => traditional-japanese-mens-attire [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-06 11:53:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-06 00:53:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=22599 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Traditional Japanese Men’s Attire

Every culture has its own practices, its own beliefs, its own folklore, and its own traditional clothing. Despite its rapid modernisation, Japan has preserved much of its own traditions, and still uphold the importance of holding on to them in order to preserve its unique Asian culture and heritage.

Japanese clothing forms a great part of Asian culture. While most items of clothing are greatly influenced by the time and age during which they were invented, some others keep up with the times and have evolved greatly with the passing of the age. Some others are worn only on special occasions.

Let’s take a closer look at the most traditional Japanese men’s attire.

Hoari

Haori - Traditional Japanese Mens Attire

Image: discopalace used under the Creative Commons Licence

Though bereft of elaborate patterns, the hoari is a jacket that has the same shape as the traditional Japanese kimono, but it is actually half its length. Men wear this garment on top of the much longer kimono. What’s unique about the hoari is that it does not overlap at the front portion like a kimono; it is worn slightly open.

Himo

Himo - Traditional Japanese Mens Attire

Courtesy of Royalty Free Google Images

This is an accessory rather than a garment. It resembles a belt that is popular in western clothing and is worn with the haori. It may come with patterned linings, including tea ceremony items, processions, lucky charms, and landscape scenes.

Obi

Obi - Traditional Japanese Mens Attire

Image:  sebastian used under the Creative Commons Licence

The obi is a garment that is used to fasten a kimono. There are specific instructions followed when tying an obi into a traditional clam knot. This particular knot is ideal for women for their yukata kimono. The traditional position of the knot is at the back of the kimono, and it is important to follow the right way on how to make this type of knot.

Hakama

Hakama - Japanese clothing forms

Image:  Last used under the Creative Commons Licence

This garment may be undivided as a skirt (andon) or as a typical pair of trousers (umanori). In most cases, the hakama is worn by people who engage in martial arts including aikido, iaido, naginata, and kendo. Hakamas also have pleats, a padded portion at the lower back part of the wearer (koshita), and a himo or long fabric tied at the waist.

Happi and Hanten

happi Japanese clothing forms

Image: Nemo’s great uncle used under the Creative Commons Licence

These garments are made of cotton and come with simple shapes without the typical intricate style of kimono sleeves. The happi coat is worn by men during festivals while hanten jackets are usually worn by tradesmen.

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