Culture - Chinese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 23898 [post_author] => 569 [post_date] => 2016-01-14 06:30:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-01-13 19:30:00 [post_content] => The practice of gift-giving is important in Chinese culture. It is important to get something heartfelt and wrap it neatly. Be sure never to roughly stuff the gift into a cheap plastic bag, however colourful that bag may be! The Chinese New Year is the perfect time to get your loved ones something special. We present to you the most traditional Chinese New Year gifts.

Hongbao

Hongbao

Image: capitan jen used under the Creative Commons Licence

This is by far the most traditional Chinese New Year gift. A hongbao is an elaborately decorated red envelope filled with money. If you’re filling the envelope with hundreds, make sure you avoid the 4s. 400 is an unlucky gift. 800, on the other hand, is a “beloved number”. The significance of the hongbao is more than the money as it is considered a gift of good luck to the recipient.

Tea

Tea

Image: Michael Camilleri used under the Creative Commons Licence

You can never go wrong with tea when it comes to a Chinese festival! A tin of tea is the best way to go, really. Splurge on a fancy box of oolong or green tea from a respectable teashop – they’ll give you the best quality tea at the best price.

Lanterns

Lanterns

Image: Juliana Phang used under the Creative Commons Licence

These will brighten up anyone’s doorstep. A lantern is the main focus of attention of the celebration as it symbolises the wish for a bright future. Chinese believe that the red colour is a symbol of happiness and gold is a symbol of wealth. These two colours are always present in most Chinese traditional lanterns.

Fruit Basket

Fruit Basket

Image: -l.i.l.l.i.a.n- used under the Creative Commons Licence

A ubiquitous symbol of the Chinese New Year, a fruit basket will immediately strike a chord with the host who’s invited you home for lunch. Giving a box of oranges or a box of apples is highly recommended as apples and oranges symbolize safety and fortune. If you want the best basket, try buying the fruits yourself, and pick the basket yourself. Top it off with a beautiful red ribbon, and you have the best gift for the New Year.

Sweets

Sweets

Image: Juliana Phang used under the Creative Commons Licence

Who doesn’t love sweets? Pick up boxes of traditional Chinese sweets like Non Gou (sticky cake)  on the way back home to your loved ones, or even if you’re off to someone’s house for dinner.

Gifts for kids

It's vacation time for the kids and you can pick up some amazing gifts like school supplies, clothes, toys, books, and candies as well. The kids will love it if you hand them a red envelope full of good wishes and cash. [post_title] => Traditional Chinese New Year Gifts [post_excerpt] => The Chinese New Year is the perfect time to get your loved ones something special. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => traditional-chinese-new-year-gifts [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-30 14:21:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-30 03:21:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=23898 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Traditional Chinese New Year Gifts

The practice of gift-giving is important in Chinese culture. It is important to get something heartfelt and wrap it neatly. Be sure never to roughly stuff the gift into a cheap plastic bag, however colourful that bag may be!

The Chinese New Year is the perfect time to get your loved ones something special. We present to you the most traditional Chinese New Year gifts.

Hongbao

Hongbao

Image: capitan jen used under the Creative Commons Licence

This is by far the most traditional Chinese New Year gift. A hongbao is an elaborately decorated red envelope filled with money. If you’re filling the envelope with hundreds, make sure you avoid the 4s. 400 is an unlucky gift. 800, on the other hand, is a “beloved number”. The significance of the hongbao is more than the money as it is considered a gift of good luck to the recipient.

Tea

Tea

Image: Michael Camilleri used under the Creative Commons Licence

You can never go wrong with tea when it comes to a Chinese festival! A tin of tea is the best way to go, really. Splurge on a fancy box of oolong or green tea from a respectable teashop – they’ll give you the best quality tea at the best price.

Lanterns

Lanterns

Image: Juliana Phang used under the Creative Commons Licence

These will brighten up anyone’s doorstep. A lantern is the main focus of attention of the celebration as it symbolises the wish for a bright future. Chinese believe that the red colour is a symbol of happiness and gold is a symbol of wealth. These two colours are always present in most Chinese traditional lanterns.

Fruit Basket

Fruit Basket

Image: -l.i.l.l.i.a.n- used under the Creative Commons Licence

A ubiquitous symbol of the Chinese New Year, a fruit basket will immediately strike a chord with the host who’s invited you home for lunch. Giving a box of oranges or a box of apples is highly recommended as apples and oranges symbolize safety and fortune. If you want the best basket, try buying the fruits yourself, and pick the basket yourself. Top it off with a beautiful red ribbon, and you have the best gift for the New Year.

Sweets

Sweets

Image: Juliana Phang used under the Creative Commons Licence

Who doesn’t love sweets? Pick up boxes of traditional Chinese sweets like Non Gou (sticky cake)  on the way back home to your loved ones, or even if you’re off to someone’s house for dinner.

Gifts for kids

It’s vacation time for the kids and you can pick up some amazing gifts like school supplies, clothes, toys, books, and candies as well. The kids will love it if you hand them a red envelope full of good wishes and cash.

You May Also Like

Budae Jjigae

Budae Jjigae

Inspirational Stories

Inspirational Stories

CNY 2016 WINNERS

Kate Brodhurst

Rosalin Kristiani

Glenda Mc Donnell

Michael J Sabo

Melinda Savage

Lisa-Jane Fudge

Lillie Giang

Justine Withers

Julia Brodska

Josephine Chan

Sally-Ann Haw

Store Locator

Find your nearest Asian Store

Search


Our Newsletter

Sign up for an authentic Asian experience. From exotic cuisines to fascinating destinations to cooking competitions and monthly giveaways - Discover the Authentic