Culture - Chinese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19597 [post_author] => 145 [post_date] => 2014-10-27 10:42:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-10-27 05:12:59 [post_content] => For more than 2000 years traditional Chinese medicine has been using herbal roots, plants, herbal concoctions, and body parts of animals. Originating from China, this traditional form of medicine is still considered an integral part of the Chinese culture.

Traditional Chinese MedicineImage: Dancing Lemur used under the Creative Commons Licence

Chinese cuisine is not the only thing that relies on myriad authentic ingredients. Chinese medicine does, too. Chinese medicine holds the notion that the body’s vital energy, also called ‘chi’, circulates through meridians, or channels. These meridians have branches that are connected to other organs of the body. Additionally, the focus lies on bodily functions more than the anatomical structures. A disease is considered an imbalance or a disharmony in the interactions of the meridians (yin, yang, qui, etc.) or a breakdown in communication between the body and the environment. In Hong Kong, traditional Chinese medicine is used in more than a fifth of medical consultations. It is not an alternative; it is the way the Chinese perceive life, personal health, and how they treat illness. This form of healthcare uses traditional forms of experiences, theories, and methods that the Chinese practised five millennia ago. The shops all over Hong Kong use ancient ingredients that were used in early Chinese society. These shops provide a tangible link to the practices of traditional Chinese medicine that is still thriving in the city. A popular district for purchasing traditional ingredients is Sheung Wan that has an area of more than 200 shops selling dried seafood and other medicinal elements. Ko Shing Street and Wing Lok Street are the other places famous for high-quality medicinal herbs. [post_title] => Traditional Chinese Medicine [post_excerpt] => Traditional Chinese Medicine has been using herbal ingredients for more than 2000 years. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => traditional-chinese-medicine [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-03 14:23:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-03 03:23:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=culture&p=19597 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Traditional Chinese Medicine

For more than 2000 years traditional Chinese medicine has been using herbal roots, plants, herbal concoctions, and body parts of animals. Originating from China, this traditional form of medicine is still considered an integral part of the Chinese culture.

Traditional Chinese MedicineImage: Dancing Lemur used under the Creative Commons Licence

Chinese cuisine is not the only thing that relies on myriad authentic ingredients. Chinese medicine does, too.

Chinese medicine holds the notion that the body’s vital energy, also called ‘chi’, circulates through meridians, or channels. These meridians have branches that are connected to other organs of the body. Additionally, the focus lies on bodily functions more than the anatomical structures. A disease is considered an imbalance or a disharmony in the interactions of the meridians (yin, yang, qui, etc.) or a breakdown in communication between the body and the environment.

In Hong Kong, traditional Chinese medicine is used in more than a fifth of medical consultations. It is not an alternative; it is the way the Chinese perceive life, personal health, and how they treat illness.

This form of healthcare uses traditional forms of experiences, theories, and methods that the Chinese practised five millennia ago. The shops all over Hong Kong use ancient ingredients that were used in early Chinese society. These shops provide a tangible link to the practices of traditional Chinese medicine that is still thriving in the city.

A popular district for purchasing traditional ingredients is Sheung Wan that has an area of more than 200 shops selling dried seafood and other medicinal elements. Ko Shing Street and Wing Lok Street are the other places famous for high-quality medicinal herbs.

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