Culture - Chinese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 24779 [post_author] => 569 [post_date] => 2015-01-25 09:30:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-01-24 22:30:10 [post_content] => The Double Seventh Festival, also known as the Qi Xi festival, is a traditional Chinese festival devoted to love. It is celebrated in mid-summer when the weather is delightfully warm and nature revels in golden sunlight. Like so many festivals in Asian culture, the story of the Double Seventh Festival stems from ancient folklore. The tale surrounding this festival is steeped in Chinese culture and literature. Long ago, there was an honest and kind-hearted man named Niu Lang (Cowhand). Orphaned young, he lived by himself herding cattle. One day, a fairy from heaven Zhi Nu (Weaver Maid), fell in love with him and came down secretly to earth and married him. The cowhand farmed in the field and the fairy wove at home. They lived a happy life and gave birth to a boy and a girl. Unfortunately, the God of Heaven soon found out about the two and ordered the Queen Mother of the Western Heavens to bring the fairy back.

Double Seventh FestivalCourtesy of Royalty free Google Images: used under the Creative Commons Licence

With the help of celestial cattle, the Cowhand flew to heaven with his children. When he was about to catch up with his wife, the Queen Mother took off one of her hairpins and made a stroke. A river appeared in the front of the Cowhand, and he and the Weaver Maid were separated on the two banks forever. Their loyalty to love was evident in their endless tears. Touched by this love, tens of thousands of magpies came to build a bridge to help the two be reunited. Moved by their inseparable love, the Queen Mother allowed them to meet each other on the 7th day of the 7th lunar month. This meeting has been called Qi Xi, or the Double Seventh. Today, this day is celebrated by Chinese people all over the world. In rural China, many traditions are still observed. Special sweets are made and friends and families gather close to remind each other of the love that reigned supreme all those centuries ago. [post_title] => The Double Seventh Festival [post_excerpt] => The Double Seventh Festival is a traditional Chinese festival devoted to love. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-double-seventh-festival [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-13 12:43:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-13 01:43:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=24779 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

The Double Seventh Festival

The Double Seventh Festival, also known as the Qi Xi festival, is a traditional Chinese festival devoted to love. It is celebrated in mid-summer when the weather is delightfully warm and nature revels in golden sunlight.

Like so many festivals in Asian culture, the story of the Double Seventh Festival stems from ancient folklore. The tale surrounding this festival is steeped in Chinese culture and literature.

Long ago, there was an honest and kind-hearted man named Niu Lang (Cowhand). Orphaned young, he lived by himself herding cattle. One day, a fairy from heaven Zhi Nu (Weaver Maid), fell in love with him and came down secretly to earth and married him. The cowhand farmed in the field and the fairy wove at home. They lived a happy life and gave birth to a boy and a girl. Unfortunately, the God of Heaven soon found out about the two and ordered the Queen Mother of the Western Heavens to bring the fairy back.

Double Seventh FestivalCourtesy of Royalty free Google Images: used under the Creative Commons Licence

With the help of celestial cattle, the Cowhand flew to heaven with his children. When he was about to catch up with his wife, the Queen Mother took off one of her hairpins and made a stroke. A river appeared in the front of the Cowhand, and he and the Weaver Maid were separated on the two banks forever. Their loyalty to love was evident in their endless tears. Touched by this love, tens of thousands of magpies came to build a bridge to help the two be reunited. Moved by their inseparable love, the Queen Mother allowed them to meet each other on the 7th day of the 7th lunar month. This meeting has been called Qi Xi, or the Double Seventh.

Today, this day is celebrated by Chinese people all over the world. In rural China, many traditions are still observed. Special sweets are made and friends and families gather close to remind each other of the love that reigned supreme all those centuries ago.

You May Also Like

Inspirational Stories

Inspirational Stories

Family Holidays

Family Holidays

CNY 2016 WINNERS

Kate Brodhurst

Rosalin Kristiani

Glenda Mc Donnell

Michael J Sabo

Melinda Savage

Lisa-Jane Fudge

Lillie Giang

Justine Withers

Julia Brodska

Josephine Chan

Sally-Ann Haw

Store Locator

Find your nearest Asian Store

Search


Our Newsletter

Sign up for an authentic Asian experience. From exotic cuisines to fascinating destinations to cooking competitions and monthly giveaways - Discover the Authentic