Culture - Chinese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 23076 [post_author] => 569 [post_date] => 2016-02-10 09:30:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-02-09 22:30:21 [post_content] => In many Asian cultures, fruits are considered temple offerings. In Asian culture, especially, people present platters laden with juicy apples, pineapples, and ripe mangoes on altars at temples and their homes. For the Chinese people, fruits carry a symbolic meaning, as fresh fruit on the day of the Chinese New Year symbolises life and a new beginning. Here are some of most symbolic Chinese New Year fruits.

Mandarin

Mandarin - Chinese New Year Fruits

Image: bizmac used under the Creative Commons Licence

The mandarin orange is considered a prayer or wish for good fortune, making it the most common of food offerings. As a harbinger of good luck, they are often eaten during the Chinese New Year. When visiting family or friends, 2 oranges are brought and exchanged with the host as a symbol of bestowing fortune onto each other.

Melons / Pomelo

Melons or Pomelo

Image: Jorge Elias used under the Creative Commons Licence

Melons and the Pomelo are symbolic of family unity. They express the wish that the family will, like the moon, stay large, whole, and united.

Pomegranates

Pomegranates

Image: sanpar32 used under the Creative Commons Licence

Being a fruit that’s full of seeds, the Pomegranate symbolises fertility. Half-opened fruits are kept at weddings, which are said to contain a hundred seeds, symbolising the hope for a hundred sons. Find out more about why Pomegranates are eaten during Chinese New year.

Peaches

Peaches

Image: Nancy Lehrer used under the Creative Commons Licence

Peaches portend longevity, and one almost always sees them in the hand of a man.

Apples

Apples

Image: used under the Creative Commons Licence

Apples symbolise peace. The word for apple in Chinese is ‘ping’, and the homonym of ping (in Cantonese) is peace. Now, the blossom of the apple is different; it stands for beauty. If you see one in a picture along with magnolias, it is a sign of hope that your house will be honoured and rich with beauty. [post_title] => Symbolic Chinese New Year Fruits [post_excerpt] => The Chinese people love fruits. Fresh fruit on the New Year symbolises life and a new beginning. We list some of the most symbolic Chinese New Year fruits [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => symbolic-chinese-new-year-fruits [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-30 17:28:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-30 06:28:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=23076 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Symbolic Chinese New Year Fruits

In many Asian cultures, fruits are considered temple offerings. In Asian culture, especially, people present platters laden with juicy apples, pineapples, and ripe mangoes on altars at temples and their homes.

For the Chinese people, fruits carry a symbolic meaning, as fresh fruit on the day of the Chinese New Year symbolises life and a new beginning.

Here are some of most symbolic Chinese New Year fruits.

Mandarin

Mandarin - Chinese New Year Fruits

Image: bizmac used under the Creative Commons Licence

The mandarin orange is considered a prayer or wish for good fortune, making it the most common of food offerings. As a harbinger of good luck, they are often eaten during the Chinese New Year. When visiting family or friends, 2 oranges are brought and exchanged with the host as a symbol of bestowing fortune onto each other.

Melons / Pomelo

Melons or Pomelo

Image: Jorge Elias used under the Creative Commons Licence

Melons and the Pomelo are symbolic of family unity. They express the wish that the family will, like the moon, stay large, whole, and united.

Pomegranates

Pomegranates

Image: sanpar32 used under the Creative Commons Licence

Being a fruit that’s full of seeds, the Pomegranate symbolises fertility. Half-opened fruits are kept at weddings, which are said to contain a hundred seeds, symbolising the hope for a hundred sons. Find out more about why Pomegranates are eaten during Chinese New year.

Peaches

Peaches

Image: Nancy Lehrer used under the Creative Commons Licence

Peaches portend longevity, and one almost always sees them in the hand of a man.

Apples

Apples

Image: used under the Creative Commons Licence

Apples symbolise peace. The word for apple in Chinese is ‘ping’, and the homonym of ping (in Cantonese) is peace. Now, the blossom of the apple is different; it stands for beauty. If you see one in a picture along with magnolias, it is a sign of hope that your house will be honoured and rich with beauty.

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