Culture - Thai

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17384 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2014-08-16 06:30:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-08-16 01:00:52 [post_content] => Thailand is a land of friendliness and hospitality. It is also a land of traditions, customs, and social etiquette that differ greatly from those of the Western world.

Greeting EtiquettePhoto courtesy Mark Fischer.Used under Creative Common Licence.

Greeting Etiquette in Thailand:

You can expect to meet lots of new people and make lots of new friends when in Thailand. Thai people are easy-going, and foreigners are quickly forgiven for minor mistakes in social etiquette. However, to avoid embarrassing anyone, you should have a general idea of what is expected when meeting someone for the first time:
  1. If you are with a Thai friend or host, wait for them to introduce you.
  2. Thais typically use first names, with the all-purpose title "-Khun" in front of them as a sign of respect.
  3. To perform the typical Thai greeting, called the Wai, press your palms together at about the level of your chest, and bow slightly.
  4. When someone offers you a Wai in greeting, it is considered rude not to return it. However, you are not expected to return the Wai to children, waiters, or street vendors.

Business Etiquette in Thailand:

Business culture in Thailand is formal and very hierarchical. Business relationships form slowly, and it may take a few meetings to build up the trust needed to complete a business transaction. The culture of respect, politeness, and harmony means that you will often have to read between the lines and pay close attention to non-verbal communication to know what is really being said.

Business Etiquette Photo courtesy James Lee. Used under Creative Common Licence

  1. Try to make appointments at least a month in advance. Punctuality is especially important in business settings, so arrive a few minutes early to any appointments or meetings.
  2. Men should wear dark coloured business suits. As for women, conservative suits, blouses or business dresses are appropriate.
  3. Business cards are an important part of business etiquette. If you are given a card, accept it with your right hand, look at it for a few seconds, and place it neatly in your wallet.
  4. If you are handing out your business card, offer it to the person with the highest social status first.
  5. Always show respect, humility and good humour, and avoid any display of negative emotions.
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Social Etiquette in Thailand

Thailand is a land of friendliness and hospitality. It is also a land of traditions, customs, and social etiquette that differ greatly from those of the Western world.

Greeting EtiquettePhoto courtesy Mark Fischer.Used under Creative Common Licence.

Greeting Etiquette in Thailand:

You can expect to meet lots of new people and make lots of new friends when in Thailand. Thai people are easy-going, and foreigners are quickly forgiven for minor mistakes in social etiquette. However, to avoid embarrassing anyone, you should have a general idea of what is expected when meeting someone for the first time:

  1. If you are with a Thai friend or host, wait for them to introduce you.
  2. Thais typically use first names, with the all-purpose title “-Khun” in front of them as a sign of respect.
  3. To perform the typical Thai greeting, called the Wai, press your palms together at about the level of your chest, and bow slightly.
  4. When someone offers you a Wai in greeting, it is considered rude not to return it. However, you are not expected to return the Wai to children, waiters, or street vendors.

Business Etiquette in Thailand:

Business culture in Thailand is formal and very hierarchical. Business relationships form slowly, and it may take a few meetings to build up the trust needed to complete a business transaction. The culture of respect, politeness, and harmony means that you will often have to read between the lines and pay close attention to non-verbal communication to know what is really being said.

Business Etiquette Photo courtesy James Lee. Used under Creative Common Licence

  1. Try to make appointments at least a month in advance. Punctuality is especially important in business settings, so arrive a few minutes early to any appointments or meetings.
  2. Men should wear dark coloured business suits. As for women, conservative suits, blouses or business dresses are appropriate.
  3. Business cards are an important part of business etiquette. If you are given a card, accept it with your right hand, look at it for a few seconds, and place it neatly in your wallet.
  4. If you are handing out your business card, offer it to the person with the highest social status first.
  5. Always show respect, humility and good humour, and avoid any display of negative emotions.

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