Culture - Vietnamese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 48383 [post_author] => 5243 [post_date] => 2017-05-09 11:30:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-09 01:30:53 [post_content] => Now that you’ve learnt about the Chinese influence on Vietnamese cuisine, and the French accent in Vietnamese food, it’s time to discover the royal cuisine of the Nguyen dynasty. A brief history lesson Hue, in Central Vietnam, was the imperial capital of the Nguyen dynasty between 1802 to 1945. Emperor Tu Duc ruled from 1829 to 1883, and it’s him we have to thank for the city’s regal cuisine. Tu Duc was said to order 50 different dishes every meal – and desired a different meal every day of the year! When he was hosting royal parties, the menu increased to more than 160 dishes. Now that’s a lot of washing up… Hue Imperial City   Image Courtesy: flickr.com

Elevating cooking to an art form

Without the agricultural diversity of Northern and Southern Vietnam, the imperial kitchens of Hue had to show an enormous amount of ingenuity, transforming simple vegetables, eggs and fish into culinary works of art. Because of this, one of the most distinctive features of the royal cuisine was the emphasis placed on presentation. Dishes were elegantly and colourfully presented, often designed to look like animals, and with names that were designed to amused the Emperor and his diners. Even a humble bowl of rice was served wrapped in an omelette, steamed inside a lotus leaf, or laced with lotus seeds.

Hue cuisine today

Today, while home cooks aren’t hovering over the stove to create 50 different dishes for dinner, the influence of imperial cuisine lives on. Hue has hundreds of signature dishes, which can be divided into three main types: - Rustic dishes made from basic ingredients and simple techniques, such as tiny clams with rice, and bun bo Hue (spicy beef noodles), and bahn beo (steamed rice cakes) - Vegetarian dishes that showcase fresh, dried and fermented plants. As Hue used to be a capital of Buddhism in Vietnam, vegetarian foods have become a specialty of the region - Imperial dishes are the most noble of dishes, but these are generally only now served in luxury restaurants or at diplomatic feasts For an authentic taste of Hue cuisine at home, try this recipe for bun bo Hue. [post_title] => Regal Eats: Vietnam’s Royal Cuisine Of The Nguyen Dynasty [post_excerpt] => Learn about Vietnam’s royal cuisine of the Nguyen dynasty, including the history of imperial cuisine in Hue, some of the signature Vietnamese recipes of Hue, and the stories behind Tu Duc’s lavish banquets of 160 Vietnamese dishes. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => regal-eats-vietnams-royal-cuisine-of-the-nguyen-dynasty [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-09 16:39:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-09 06:39:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=48383 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Regal Eats: Vietnam’s Royal Cuisine Of The Nguyen Dynasty

Now that you’ve learnt about the Chinese influence on Vietnamese cuisine, and the French accent in Vietnamese food, it’s time to discover the royal cuisine of the Nguyen dynasty.

A brief history lesson

Hue, in Central Vietnam, was the imperial capital of the Nguyen dynasty between 1802 to 1945. Emperor Tu Duc ruled from 1829 to 1883, and it’s him we have to thank for the city’s regal cuisine. Tu Duc was said to order 50 different dishes every meal – and desired a different meal every day of the year! When he was hosting royal parties, the menu increased to more than 160 dishes. Now that’s a lot of washing up…

Hue Imperial City

 

Image Courtesy: flickr.com

Elevating cooking to an art form

Without the agricultural diversity of Northern and Southern Vietnam, the imperial kitchens of Hue had to show an enormous amount of ingenuity, transforming simple vegetables, eggs and fish into culinary works of art. Because of this, one of the most distinctive features of the royal cuisine was the emphasis placed on presentation. Dishes were elegantly and colourfully presented, often designed to look like animals, and with names that were designed to amused the Emperor and his diners. Even a humble bowl of rice was served wrapped in an omelette, steamed inside a lotus leaf, or laced with lotus seeds.

Hue cuisine today

Today, while home cooks aren’t hovering over the stove to create 50 different dishes for dinner, the influence of imperial cuisine lives on. Hue has hundreds of signature dishes, which can be divided into three main types:
- Rustic dishes made from basic ingredients and simple techniques, such as tiny clams with rice, and bun bo Hue (spicy beef noodles), and bahn beo (steamed rice cakes)
- Vegetarian dishes that showcase fresh, dried and fermented plants. As Hue used to be a capital of Buddhism in Vietnam, vegetarian foods have become a specialty of the region
- Imperial dishes are the most noble of dishes, but these are generally only now served in luxury restaurants or at diplomatic feasts

For an authentic taste of Hue cuisine at home, try this recipe for bun bo Hue.

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