Culture - Chinese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 43321 [post_author] => 5243 [post_date] => 2016-02-16 06:30:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-02-15 19:30:24 [post_content] => Come Chinese Lunar New Year, most households celebrate it with a reunion dinner. While we are familiar with the many festive dishes that are prepared for one of the largest festivals in the world, there's also a traditional dish that most of us would not be familiar with. We're talking about Pun Choy (Prosperity Treasure Pot), the one pot Chinese meal that is served on New Year's Eve and during the reunion dinner.

Pun ChoyPun Choy (Prosperity Treasure Pot)

Pun Choy is also known as Pen Cai or Poon Choi which literally means 'basin vegetables' and has its origin in the Song dynasty. It is believed that the poor villagers collected the best food in town and put it into a large wooden bowl/basin and served it to their King and army, and that is why it is known as the Big Bowl Feast. The Cantonese call it Pun Choy while in Singapore, it is known in Mandarin as Peng Chai. However, the local business merchants named it as Auspicious, Fortune, Treasure or Prosperity Pot. In the modern days, regardless of its name, it has become a trend to have Pun Choy as part of Chinese Lunar New Year reunion meal. This dish is normally filled to the brim with layers and layers of seafood, meat, vegetables, and seasonings and has a scintillating fragrance. A unique feature of the Pun Choy is that the ingredients are cooked in a large pot and layered with seafood such as abalone (for good fortune) and scallops (for new opportunities and luck) and other auspicious ingredients. Eating Pun Choy signifies abundance and richness in the coming year. The other ingredients that go into a Pun Choy are prawns, broccoli, radish, fatt choy (black moss), mushrooms, fish maw, siu yuk (crispy roast pork), and roast duck. Each ingredient is symbolic of something special.

Siu Yuk, Roast Duck and Dried OysterMust-haves in Pun Choy: Siu yuk, roast duck and dried oysters.

So welcome richness, share joy and fortune together with your loved ones this Chinese Lunar New Year and try this Pun Choy recipe. [post_title] => Pun Choy - Symbolism in a Pot [post_excerpt] => Pun Choy- This One Pot Chinese Meal that is served during Chinese Lunar New Year that is full of symbolism. Find out what goes into this prosperity pot and what it signifies. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => pen-cai-a-chinese-meal-with-a-symbolism [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-02-01 12:48:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-02-01 01:48:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=43321 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Pun Choy – Symbolism in a Pot

Come Chinese Lunar New Year, most households celebrate it with a reunion dinner. While we are familiar with the many festive dishes that are prepared for one of the largest festivals in the world, there’s also a traditional dish that most of us would not be familiar with. We’re talking about Pun Choy (Prosperity Treasure Pot), the one pot Chinese meal that is served on New Year’s Eve and during the reunion dinner.

Pun ChoyPun Choy (Prosperity Treasure Pot)

Pun Choy is also known as Pen Cai or Poon Choi which literally means ‘basin vegetables’ and has its origin in the Song dynasty. It is believed that the poor villagers collected the best food in town and put it into a large wooden bowl/basin and served it to their King and army, and that is why it is known as the Big Bowl Feast.

The Cantonese call it Pun Choy while in Singapore, it is known in Mandarin as Peng Chai. However, the local business merchants named it as Auspicious, Fortune, Treasure or Prosperity Pot. In the modern days, regardless of its name, it has become a trend to have Pun Choy as part of Chinese Lunar New Year reunion meal.

This dish is normally filled to the brim with layers and layers of seafood, meat, vegetables, and seasonings and has a scintillating fragrance.

A unique feature of the Pun Choy is that the ingredients are cooked in a large pot and layered with seafood such as abalone (for good fortune) and scallops (for new opportunities and luck) and other auspicious ingredients. Eating Pun Choy signifies abundance and richness in the coming year. The other ingredients that go into a Pun Choy are prawns, broccoli, radish, fatt choy (black moss), mushrooms, fish maw, siu yuk (crispy roast pork), and roast duck. Each ingredient is symbolic of something special.

Siu Yuk, Roast Duck and Dried OysterMust-haves in Pun Choy: Siu yuk, roast duck and dried oysters.

So welcome richness, share joy and fortune together with your loved ones this Chinese Lunar New Year and try this Pun Choy recipe.

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