Culture - Chinese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 47099 [post_author] => 5243 [post_date] => 2016-09-14 07:30:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-13 21:30:59 [post_content] => The second-biggest event on the Asian calendar, the Moon Festival, also known as the Mid-Autumn Festival, traditionally celebrates an auspicious harvest. Held on the 15 th day of the eighth lunar month, the Moon Festival is a time to gather with family and give thanks to ancestors and nature. In 2016, the Moon Festival falls on September 15. The Moon Festival is celebrated across the world, with an array of activities, such as moon gazing, savouring mooncakes, watching dragon dances and lavish displays of colourful paper lanterns. For the most impressive festivities, set your sights on the major cities of China, Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Vietnam and Thailand. Shanghai - Top 3 Asian Places to Visit During Moon festival The Chinese Moon Festival legend can be traced back thousands of years to a time when farmers celebrated the mid-Autumn rice harvest and recognised the moon’s role in the change of seasons. Over the years, special dishes were created to represent the moon, such as the iconic mooncakes. Other festival fare includes duck, taro, oranges and rice cakes, all of which are traditionally harvested in autumn. In Korea, the Moon Festival, called Chuseok, is a time to pay respect to one’s ancestors, typically with a banquet. Families reunite during this time and mark the occasion with rice-based dishes, such as songpyeon (sweet mooncakes made with red beans, chestnut, rice and pine), hangwa (confectionery) and sikhye (a traditional sweet Korean rice drink). Why the Mooncake was used as a Secret Weapon The Japanese Moon Festival, or Otsukimi, is a time for introspection and gazing at the moon, a practice known as tsukimi. Again, rice-based dishes are a signature here, with tsukimi dango (rice-flour dumplings) enjoyed by one and all. The Mid-Autumn celebrations in Vietnam, called Tet Trung Thu, are strikingly similar to the Chinese festivities. Also known as the Children’s Festival, the Moon Festival in Vietnam includes lantern making, mooncakes and family get-togethers. Likewise, Malaysia’s Moon Festival pays homage to the Chinese traditions, with dragon dances, lanterns and moon gazing. Also known as the Tanglung (Lantern) Festival, the Malaysia Moon Festival is marked with a family feast, followed by mooncakes. In Thailand, the Moon Festival is not an extravagant affair – instead, it is a time for families to gather together, to pray, exchange greetings and worship to the moon. [post_title] => Moon Festival Celebrations Across Asia [post_excerpt] => The Moon Festival is a multicultural affair, with lavish celebrations across Asia and beyond. Find out how the Moon Festival, or Mid-Autumn Festival, is celebrated in China, Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Malaysia and Thailand. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => moon-festival-celebrations-across-asia [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-09-09 21:47:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-09-09 11:47:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=47099 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Moon Festival Celebrations Across Asia

The second-biggest event on the Asian calendar, the Moon Festival, also known as the Mid-Autumn Festival, traditionally celebrates an auspicious harvest. Held on the 15 th day of the eighth lunar month, the Moon Festival is a time to gather with family and give thanks to ancestors and nature. In 2016, the Moon Festival
falls on September 15.

The Moon Festival is celebrated across the world, with an array of activities, such as moon gazing, savouring mooncakes, watching dragon dances and lavish displays of colourful paper lanterns. For the most impressive festivities, set your sights on the major cities of China, Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Vietnam and Thailand.

Shanghai - Top 3 Asian Places to Visit During Moon festival

The Chinese Moon Festival legend can be traced back thousands of years to a time when farmers celebrated the mid-Autumn rice harvest and recognised the moon’s role in the change of seasons.

Over the years, special dishes were created to represent the moon, such as the iconic mooncakes. Other festival fare includes duck, taro, oranges and rice cakes, all of which are traditionally harvested in autumn.

In Korea, the Moon Festival, called Chuseok, is a time to pay respect to one’s ancestors, typically with a banquet. Families reunite during this time and mark the occasion with rice-based dishes, such as songpyeon (sweet mooncakes made with red beans, chestnut, rice and pine), hangwa (confectionery) and sikhye (a traditional sweet Korean rice drink).

Why the Mooncake was used as a Secret Weapon

The Japanese Moon Festival, or Otsukimi, is a time for introspection and gazing at the moon, a practice known as tsukimi. Again, rice-based dishes are a signature here, with tsukimi dango (rice-flour dumplings) enjoyed by one and all.

The Mid-Autumn celebrations in Vietnam, called Tet Trung Thu, are strikingly similar to the Chinese festivities. Also known as the Children’s Festival, the Moon Festival in Vietnam includes lantern making, mooncakes and family get-togethers.

Likewise, Malaysia’s Moon Festival pays homage to the Chinese traditions, with dragon dances, lanterns and moon gazing. Also known as the Tanglung (Lantern) Festival, the Malaysia Moon Festival is marked with a family feast,
followed by mooncakes.

In Thailand, the Moon Festival is not an extravagant affair – instead, it is a time for families to gather together, to pray, exchange greetings and worship to the moon.

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