Culture - Japanese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 34207 [post_author] => 569 [post_date] => 2015-04-26 09:30:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-25 23:30:18 [post_content] => Weddings around the world have more in common than you think. For one thing, much emphasis is placed on the type of food served. If the food at a wedding is poor, it's almost the only thing that lingers in the guests' mind! This much is true of Japanese weddings as well, where the menu on the big day is given much importance. Japanese wedding food culture plays a huge role in deciding what dishes are served at the wedding. Japanese Wedding Food Culture

Image: Yusuke Kawasaki used under the Creative Commons Licence

The most common dishes one can see on a plate at a Japanese wedding are Sekihan (red azuki beans rice), Kombu (kelp), and Kazunoko (herring roe). Kazunoko is served at a wedding mainly because it is a symbol of fertility. Japanese-Wedding-Food-Culture

Image: Jonathan McIntosh used under the Creative Commons Licence

Japanese sushi cakes and daifuku are also made for guests. While sushi cakes are eaten separately, daifuku are served with green tea. This sweet is a symbol of peace, harmony and everlasting happiness. Much like the wide range of delicacies from various Asian cuisines, the food culture in Japan is also rich in tradition, creativity, and brilliance. It allows room for modernity while retaining several ancient traditions. Much of these traditions have to do with the foods served, and the manner in which they are served. For example, foods which symbolise happiness are served and consumed first, followed by the more savoury dishes. Another custom is to always plate up dishes in odd numbers, which is predicated on the belief that odd numbers never divide married couples. It's an interesting experience to dig into a Japanese wedding lunch - you can be assured there's enough cultural history attached to each dish to stretch back at least 400 to 500 years. The most satisfying culinary experience is how the food serves as a taste of how the people of yesteryear dined, and you can be certain that every bite is filled with tradition. [post_title] => Japanese Wedding Food Culture [post_excerpt] => The food culture in Japan is rich, much like most of the delicacies of this wonderful Asian cuisine. It allows room for modernity while retaining several ancient traditions. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => japanese-wedding-food-culture [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-15 18:16:30 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-15 07:16:30 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=34207 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Japanese Wedding Food Culture

Weddings around the world have more in common than you think. For one thing, much emphasis is placed on the type of food served. If the food at a wedding is poor, it’s almost the only thing that lingers in the guests’ mind!

This much is true of Japanese weddings as well, where the menu on the big day is given much importance. Japanese wedding food culture plays a huge role in deciding what dishes are served at the wedding.

Japanese Wedding Food Culture

Image: Yusuke Kawasaki used under the Creative Commons Licence

The most common dishes one can see on a plate at a Japanese wedding are Sekihan (red azuki beans rice), Kombu (kelp), and Kazunoko (herring roe). Kazunoko is served at a wedding mainly because it is a symbol of fertility.

Japanese-Wedding-Food-Culture

Image: Jonathan McIntosh used under the Creative Commons Licence

Japanese sushi cakes and daifuku are also made for guests. While sushi cakes are eaten separately, daifuku are served with green tea. This sweet is a symbol of peace, harmony and everlasting happiness.

Much like the wide range of delicacies from various Asian cuisines, the food culture in Japan is also rich in tradition, creativity, and brilliance. It allows room for modernity while retaining several ancient traditions. Much of these traditions have to do with the foods served, and the manner in which they are served. For example, foods which symbolise happiness are served and consumed first, followed by the more savoury dishes. Another custom is to always plate up dishes in odd numbers, which is predicated on the belief that odd numbers never divide married couples.

It’s an interesting experience to dig into a Japanese wedding lunch – you can be assured there’s enough cultural history attached to each dish to stretch back at least 400 to 500 years. The most satisfying culinary experience is how the food serves as a taste of how the people of yesteryear dined, and you can be certain that every bite is filled with tradition.

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