Culture - Chinese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 23862 [post_author] => 569 [post_date] => 2016-01-12 06:30:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-01-11 19:30:22 [post_content] => In the streets of towns and cities in China, or other countries like Australia, where the Chinese New Year is marked by great pomp and show, this month witnesses a celebration that is famous for its parades, delicious food, and fun family time. Interesting Chinese New Year Facts

Image: Emma Gawen used under the Creative Commons Licence

The Chinese New Year is a time of unbounded joy. It runs for two weeks, and there’s so much to soak in and embrace. With so much happening, you might miss out on quite a bit of it. So, here is a few interesting Chinese New Year facts that you would want to take note of.

Moon takes center stage

The Chinese base their 15-day festival – the Chinese New Year – on the timing of the moon, with the New Year marked by the first new moon of each calendar year and ends on the full moon.

The best Chinese cuisine on your platter

The best of Chinese cuisine is on display during the New Year. Combining flavour and tradition, the Chinese plate up some delectable Nian Gao Cake, Steamed Rice Pudding, Long Noodles, and Dumplings.

Embellished homes with colourful decor

Before New Year's Day, homes are decorated with trays of oranges and, a candy tray with eight kinds of dried fruits, and vases of fresh flowers. Wishes for the New Year are written on red paper, as red symbolises joy and good fortune.

Paying respects to ancestors

People pay their respects to ancestors and family members who have passed during the festival. On New Year's Eve, a dinner for ancestors is arranged at the family banquet table, so that all family members can ring in the New Year with a communal feast.

Legend of Chinese New Year

Many of the Chinese's New Year traditions are passed down through legends. One of which tells us that the Chinese New Year began with a battle against a mythical beast called the Nian, who would come on the first day of the New Year to eat children, livestock, and crops. In order to protect themselves from the Nian, villagers put food in front of their doors believing that the creature would eat that and leave everything else alone. It was believed that the Nian was afraid of the colour red and firecrackers, so people would hang red lanterns outside and set off firecrackers. Chinese New Year Facts

Image: IQRemix used under the Creative Commons Licence

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Interesting Chinese New Year Facts

In the streets of towns and cities in China, or other countries like Australia, where the Chinese New Year is marked by great pomp and show, this month witnesses a celebration that is famous for its parades, delicious food, and fun family time.

Interesting Chinese New Year Facts

Image: Emma Gawen used under the Creative Commons Licence

The Chinese New Year is a time of unbounded joy. It runs for two weeks, and there’s so much to soak in and embrace. With so much happening, you might miss out on quite a bit of it. So, here is a few interesting Chinese New Year facts that you would want to take note of.

Moon takes center stage

The Chinese base their 15-day festival – the Chinese New Year – on the timing of the moon, with the New Year marked by the first new moon of each calendar year and ends on the full moon.

The best Chinese cuisine on your platter

The best of Chinese cuisine is on display during the New Year. Combining flavour and tradition, the Chinese plate up some delectable Nian Gao Cake, Steamed Rice Pudding, Long Noodles, and Dumplings.

Embellished homes with colourful decor

Before New Year’s Day, homes are decorated with trays of oranges and, a candy tray with eight kinds of dried fruits, and vases of fresh flowers. Wishes for the New Year are written on red paper, as red symbolises joy and good fortune.

Paying respects to ancestors

People pay their respects to ancestors and family members who have passed during the festival. On New Year’s Eve, a dinner for ancestors is arranged at the family banquet table, so that all family members can ring in the New Year with a communal feast.

Legend of Chinese New Year

Many of the Chinese’s New Year traditions are passed down through legends. One of which tells us that the Chinese New Year began with a battle against a mythical beast called the Nian, who would come on the first day of the New Year to eat children, livestock, and crops. In order to protect themselves from the Nian, villagers put food in front of their doors believing that the creature would eat that and leave everything else alone. It was believed that the Nian was afraid of the colour red and firecrackers, so people would hang red lanterns outside and set off firecrackers.

Chinese New Year Facts

Image: IQRemix used under the Creative Commons Licence

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