Culture - Chinese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 38333 [post_author] => 1006 [post_date] => 2015-09-21 09:30:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-09-20 23:30:51 [post_content] =>

Moon Festival, Mid-Autumn Festival or Lantern Festival, while it goes by different names, depending on who you ask, Moon Festival is still one of the most significant of Chinese traditional festivals, and it symbolises a time of reunion for Chinese families. As the family unit is an important and integral part of life, the festival is often celebrated with great splendour across the world.

Here’s how the moon festival is celebrated in other Southeast Asian countries:

Korea

In Korea, the festival is known as "Daeboreum" which means "Great Full Moon". This holiday is accompanied by many traditions in which the Koreans crack nuts open with their teeth as it is believed that it will help keep one's teeth healthy for the year. Yet another custom is that people climb mountains, during this festival to catch a glimpse of the first rise of the moon which is said to bring good luck and fulfil all their wishes. Koreans eat dishes made of five grains consisting of glutinous rice, millets, beans, and red beans with various dried herbs. They also have a special drink called 'Ear-quickening wine' which, when consumed is known to bless people with all good news in the upcoming years. How the Moon Festival is Celebrated in Other Southeast Asian Countries

Image: dingopup used under the Creative Commons Licence

Japan

In Japan the moon festival is known as Tsukimi, which literally means "moon-viewing". The celebration of the full moon typically takes place on the 15th day of the eighth month of the traditional Japanese solar calendar; the waxing moon is celebrated on the 13th day of the ninth month. These days normally fall in September and October of the modern solar calendar.

Tsukimi traditions include displaying decorations made from Japanese pampas grass (susuki) and eating rice dumplings called Tsukimi dango in order to celebrate the beauty of the moon. Seasonal produces are also presented as offerings to the moon. Boiled soba or udon noodles topped with nori and raw egg, then covered with broth are known as Tsukimi soba or Tsukimi udon are served during the festival. Tsukimi soba - Celebration of Moon Festival in Southeast Asian Countries

Image: Shubert Ciencia  used under the Creative Commons Licence

Vietnam

The Mid-Autumn festival is named "Tết Trung Thu" in Vietnam. It is also known as the "Children's Festival" because of the event's emphasis on children. In olden times, the Vietnamese believed that children, being innocent and pure, had the closest connection to the sacred and natural world. The popular  Vietnamese folktale  describes  the legend of Cuội, whose wife accidentally excreted on a sacred banyan tree. The tree began to float towards the moon, and Cuội, tried to pull it back down to earth, which floated to the moon with it, leaving him stranded there. Every year, during the Mid-Autumn Festival, children light lanterns and participate in a procession to show Cuội the way back to Earth. The Vietnamese eat rice figurines made of glutinous rice that are colourfully made specially for the children.

Thailand

The Mid-Autumn festival is called the "prayer festival" by Thais. It is also a time for paying a token of gratitude to nature for its bounty and to remember the ancestors. The Chinese temples in Thailand are mostly crowded during this time of the year with people offering incense, candles and fruits to the Moon goddess. The devotees are clad in red attires– the luckiest and most auspicious color for Chinese people. Thais offer peach-shaped cakes to the Buddha on this day. Family and friends gather around the table with offerings to worship the moon, pray and exchange greetings.

Malaysia

In Malaysia, the Mid-Autumn Festival is celebrated with great aplomb and grandeur.  The Chinese have long had the custom of eating mooncakes and enjoy the bright full moon that shines at its best and take part in the lantern parade.  Chinese Malaysians also share special mooncakes that come in different flavours, with other communities and together create lanterns and have reunion dinners. They have lantern parades in which there would be the dragon and lion dances.  The city of Kuala Lumpur is decked with brightly lit lanterns, that offer a breathtaking view.

Singapore

In Singapore, the usual tradition of eating moon cakes along with the moon cakes and lighting lanterns are common.  However, a specialty is that in Singapore the mooncakes are made of Durians and taro that gives it a special flavor. [post_title] => How the Moon Festival is Celebrated in Other Southeast Asian Countries [post_excerpt] => Mid-Autumn Festival is a Chinese traditional festival. The moon festival is celebrated with great splendor across the world as per their customs and cultural practices. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-the-moon-festival-is-celebrated-in-other-southeast-asian-countries [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-28 10:59:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-27 23:59:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=38333 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

How the Moon Festival is Celebrated in Other Southeast Asian Countries

Moon Festival, Mid-Autumn Festival or Lantern Festival, while it goes by different names, depending on who you ask, Moon Festival is still one of the most significant of Chinese traditional festivals, and it symbolises a time of reunion for Chinese families. As the family unit is an important and integral part of life, the festival is often celebrated with great splendour across the world.

Here’s how the moon festival is celebrated in other Southeast Asian countries:

Korea

In Korea, the festival is known as “Daeboreum” which means “Great Full Moon”. This holiday is accompanied by many traditions in which the Koreans crack nuts open with their teeth as it is believed that it will help keep one’s teeth healthy for the year.

Yet another custom is that people climb mountains, during this festival to catch a glimpse of the first rise of the moon which is said to bring good luck and fulfil all their wishes.

Koreans eat dishes made of five grains consisting of glutinous rice, millets, beans, and red beans with various dried herbs. They also have a special drink called ‘Ear-quickening wine’ which, when consumed is known to bless people with all good news in the upcoming years.

How the Moon Festival is Celebrated in Other Southeast Asian Countries

Image: dingopup used under the Creative Commons Licence

Japan

In Japan the moon festival is known as Tsukimi, which literally means “moon-viewing”. The celebration of the full moon typically takes place on the 15th day of the eighth month of the traditional Japanese solar calendar; the waxing moon is celebrated on the 13th day of the ninth month. These days normally fall in September and October of the modern solar calendar.

Tsukimi traditions include displaying decorations made from Japanese pampas grass (susuki) and eating rice dumplings called Tsukimi dango in order to celebrate the beauty of the moon. Seasonal produces are also presented as offerings to the moon.

Boiled soba or udon noodles topped with nori and raw egg, then covered with broth are known as Tsukimi soba or Tsukimi udon are served during the festival.

Tsukimi soba - Celebration of Moon Festival in Southeast Asian Countries

Image: Shubert Ciencia  used under the Creative Commons Licence

Vietnam

The Mid-Autumn festival is named “Tết Trung Thu” in Vietnam. It is also known as the “Children’s Festival” because of the event’s emphasis on children. In olden times, the Vietnamese believed that children, being innocent and pure, had the closest connection to the sacred and natural world.

The popular  Vietnamese folktale  describes  the legend of Cuội, whose wife accidentally excreted on a sacred banyan tree. The tree began to float towards the moon, and Cuội, tried to pull it back down to earth, which floated to the moon with it, leaving him stranded there. Every year, during the Mid-Autumn Festival, children light lanterns and participate in a procession to show Cuội the way back to Earth.

The Vietnamese eat rice figurines made of glutinous rice that are colourfully made specially for the children.

Thailand

The Mid-Autumn festival is called the “prayer festival” by Thais.

It is also a time for paying a token of gratitude to nature for its bounty and to remember the ancestors. The Chinese temples in Thailand are mostly crowded during this time of the year with people offering incense, candles and fruits to the Moon goddess. The devotees are clad in red attires– the luckiest and most auspicious color for Chinese people.

Thais offer peach-shaped cakes to the Buddha on this day. Family and friends gather around the table with offerings to worship the moon, pray and exchange greetings.

Malaysia

In Malaysia, the Mid-Autumn Festival is celebrated with great aplomb and grandeur.  The Chinese have long had the custom of eating mooncakes and enjoy the bright full moon that shines at its best and take part in the lantern parade.  Chinese Malaysians also share special mooncakes that come in different flavours, with other communities and together create lanterns and have reunion dinners.

They have lantern parades in which there would be the dragon and lion dances.  The city of Kuala Lumpur is decked with brightly lit lanterns, that offer a breathtaking view.

Singapore

In Singapore, the usual tradition of eating moon cakes along with the moon cakes and lighting lanterns are common.  However, a specialty is that in Singapore the mooncakes are made of Durians and taro that gives it a special flavor.

You May Also Like

Inspirational Stories

Inspirational Stories

Family Holidays

Family Holidays

CNY 2016 WINNERS

Kate Brodhurst

Rosalin Kristiani

Glenda Mc Donnell

Michael J Sabo

Melinda Savage

Lisa-Jane Fudge

Lillie Giang

Justine Withers

Julia Brodska

Josephine Chan

Sally-Ann Haw

Store Locator

Find your nearest Asian Store

Search


Our Newsletter

Sign up for an authentic Asian experience. From exotic cuisines to fascinating destinations to cooking competitions and monthly giveaways - Discover the Authentic