Culture - Chinese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 25436 [post_author] => 569 [post_date] => 2016-01-19 09:30:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-01-18 22:30:59 [post_content] => There are many signs and symbols from around the world that people see as lucky. Others are thought to bring good fortune to the person that possesses them. Some believe some symbols can grant wishes or even heal the sick, whereas some are used in warding off evil and curses. There is certainly no shortage of symbols of luck and good fortune in Asian culture. These symbols are easily seen in everyday life, but sometimes their meaning is not easily discernible, especially when it comes to those used in Chinese culture. Here are some of the most popular Chinese good luck symbols:

Numbers

Symbolise wealth, prosperity, success, and longevity. chinese good luck numbers

Image: 8 Eyes Photography used under the Creative Commons Licence

According to Chinese culture, the luckiest numbers are six (good for business), eight (representing wealth and prosperity), and nine (meaning long-lasting), and the unluckiest is the number four (similar to the word ‘death’).

Cabbage

Symbolise wealth and prosperity. chinese good luck symbols - cabbage

Image: net_efekt used under the Creative Commons Licence

The Chinese name for the Napa cabbage is homophonous with the words ‘hundred’ and ‘wealth’ and it is viewed as a sign of prosperity in China. Believed to bring hundreds of years of wealth, the cabbage is often used as a symbol in glass and porcelain figures.

Lucky Cat

Symbolise good luck and good fortune. chinese good luck symbols - lucky cat

Image: used under the Creative Commons Licence

This figurine, which originates in Japan, has become increasingly popular with Chinese merchants.  It is made of ceramic and is believed to bring good luck to a shop owner, oftentimes displayed at the entrance of a shop, restaurant, or other business.  The cat’s typical colours are white, black, gold, and sometimes red, and it is often made holding a coin.

Money Tree

Symbolizing abundance and wealth. chinese good luck symbols - money tree

Image: Francis Chung used under the Creative Commons Licence

The Malabar chestnut tree plays an important role in East Asian culture and it has now become known as the ‘money tree’. Its popularity came about in 1986 when a Taiwanese truck driver braided the trunks of five small money trees planted in a single pot. The money tree is thought to bring good fortune and luck to those who place it in their home or office. As the tree grows, distinctive five-leaf stems sprout from it and the abundance of leaves is often reflective of the owner's financial fortune. [post_title] => Four Chinese Good Luck Symbols [post_excerpt] => Lucky symbols are popular worldwide and take many forms. Here are some Chinese good luck symbols. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => four-chinese-good-luck-symbols [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-30 15:02:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-30 04:02:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=25436 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Four Chinese Good Luck Symbols

There are many signs and symbols from around the world that people see as lucky. Others are thought to bring good fortune to the person that possesses them. Some believe some symbols can grant wishes or even heal the sick, whereas some are used in warding off evil and curses.

There is certainly no shortage of symbols of luck and good fortune in Asian culture. These symbols are easily seen in everyday life, but sometimes their meaning is not easily discernible, especially when it comes to those used in Chinese culture. Here are some of the most popular Chinese good luck symbols:

Numbers

Symbolise wealth, prosperity, success, and longevity.

chinese good luck numbers

Image: 8 Eyes Photography used under the Creative Commons Licence

According to Chinese culture, the luckiest numbers are six (good for business), eight (representing wealth and prosperity), and nine (meaning long-lasting), and the unluckiest is the number four (similar to the word ‘death’).

Cabbage

Symbolise wealth and prosperity.

chinese good luck symbols - cabbage

Image: net_efekt used under the Creative Commons Licence

The Chinese name for the Napa cabbage is homophonous with the words ‘hundred’ and ‘wealth’ and it is viewed as a sign of prosperity in China. Believed to bring hundreds of years of wealth, the cabbage is often used as a symbol in glass and porcelain figures.

Lucky Cat

Symbolise good luck and good fortune.

chinese good luck symbols - lucky cat

Image: used under the Creative Commons Licence

This figurine, which originates in Japan, has become increasingly popular with Chinese merchants.  It is made of ceramic and is believed to bring good luck to a shop owner, oftentimes displayed at the entrance of a shop, restaurant, or other business.  The cat’s typical colours are white, black, gold, and sometimes red, and it is often made holding a coin.

Money Tree

Symbolizing abundance and wealth.

chinese good luck symbols - money tree

Image: Francis Chung used under the Creative Commons Licence

The Malabar chestnut tree plays an important role in East Asian culture and it has now become known as the ‘money tree’. Its popularity came about in 1986 when a Taiwanese truck driver braided the trunks of five small money trees planted in a single pot. The money tree is thought to bring good fortune and luck to those who place it in their home or office. As the tree grows, distinctive five-leaf stems sprout from it and the abundance of leaves is often reflective of the owner’s financial fortune.

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