Culture - Japanese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 50346 [post_author] => 569 [post_date] => 2017-09-13 17:48:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-13 07:48:55 [post_content] => In Japan, the Mid-Autumn Festival is known as Tsukimi, which literally translates to ‘moon watch’. Just like the Moon Festival celebrations in China, Tsukimi takes place on the 15th day of the eighth lunar month, when the moon is said to be at its brightest and most beautiful. This time marks the end of the traditional harvest season, when ingredients are at their most bountiful.   The Tsukimi moon-viewing custom was first introduced to Japan by the Chinese during the Heian period, 1000 years ago. Since that time, the Japanese people have made it their own, and Tsukimi has evolved into a solemn celebration, with a range of customs and food unique to the country.   Read about the traditions and legends of the Japanese Moon Festival   Things to do during Tsukimi
  • Worship the full moon by finding a vantage point to take in the view. During autumn, the moon is particularly bright and full.
  • Express gratitude by making an offering of pampas grass, freshly harvested produce and tsukimi dango (rice dumplings).
  • Decorate your roof with susuki (pampas grass), which is at its tallest during autumn and is a symbol of nature’s bounty.
  • Dress in a kimono and light incense at the local shrine, where traditional songs and dances are performed.
  • Visit Chinatown in Kobe or Yokohama to witness the Chinese-inspired lion dances.
japanese-tsukimi Things to eat during Tsukimi
  • No Japanese Moon Festival celebration would be complete without a serve of tsukimi dango, chewy white dumplings made from rice flour, designed to resemble the full moon. Tsukimi dango are served plain, often stacked in a pyramid to represent an offering to the moon. (Dangos are also eaten during the Cherry Blossom Festival in spring.)
  • Autumnal ingredients such as chestnuts, taro (yam), and kabocha (Japanese pumpkin) are served, simply steamed or roasted to enhance their natural flavour.
  • Thanks to their resemblance to a full moon, eggs are often seen as a symbolic food of Tsukimi. One favourite way to serve eggs during the Japanese Moon Festival is to crack a raw egg into a bowl of soba or udon noodles and boiling-hot broth, just like the Tokushima Ramen.
    For more on the Moon Festival celebrations across Asia, take a peek at the Mid-Autumn Festival in Thailand, or read about the popular dishes of the Moon Festival in China.   To celebrate the multicultural Moon Festival at home, create your own feast with Asian Inspirations’ recommended dishes – Tofu Patty with Oroshi Ponzu, Moo Sam Chun Tom Khem (Slow-cooked Pork Belly), Malaysian Satay Beef, Japchae, Pan-fried Garlic Prawns, and Pad Cha Beef). To find out more about Moon Festival celebrations and traditions all over Asia, click here. [post_title] => Celebrating Tsukimi, the Japanese Moon Festival [post_excerpt] => In Japan, the Mid-Autumn Festival is known as Tsukimi, which literally translates to ‘moon watch’. The Tsukimi Mid-Autumn Festival in Japan takes place on the 15th day of the eighth lunar month. Learn the customs and traditions of Tsukimi and find out what to eat during the Japanese Moon Festival. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => celebrating-tsukimi-the-japanese-moon-festival [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-13 18:10:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-13 08:10:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=50346 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Celebrating Tsukimi, the Japanese Moon Festival

In Japan, the Mid-Autumn Festival is known as Tsukimi, which literally translates to ‘moon watch’. Just like the Moon Festival celebrations in China, Tsukimi takes place on the 15th day of the eighth lunar month, when the moon is said to be at its brightest and most beautiful. This time marks the end of the traditional harvest season, when ingredients are at their most bountiful.

 

The Tsukimi moon-viewing custom was first introduced to Japan by the Chinese during the Heian period, 1000 years ago. Since that time, the Japanese people have made it their own, and Tsukimi has evolved into a solemn celebration, with a range of customs and food unique to the country.

 

Read about the traditions and legends of the Japanese Moon Festival

 

Things to do during Tsukimi

  • Worship the full moon by finding a vantage point to take in the view. During autumn, the moon is particularly bright and full.
  • Express gratitude by making an offering of pampas grass, freshly harvested produce and tsukimi dango (rice dumplings).
  • Decorate your roof with susuki (pampas grass), which is at its tallest during autumn and is a symbol of nature’s bounty.
  • Dress in a kimono and light incense at the local shrine, where traditional songs and dances are performed.
  • Visit Chinatown in Kobe or Yokohama to witness the Chinese-inspired lion dances.

japanese-tsukimi

Things to eat during Tsukimi

  • No Japanese Moon Festival celebration would be complete without a serve of tsukimi dango, chewy white dumplings made from rice flour, designed to resemble the full moon. Tsukimi dango are served plain, often stacked in a pyramid to represent an offering to the moon. (Dangos are also eaten during the Cherry Blossom Festival in spring.)
  • Autumnal ingredients such as chestnuts, taro (yam), and kabocha (Japanese pumpkin) are served, simply steamed or roasted to enhance their natural flavour.
  • Thanks to their resemblance to a full moon, eggs are often seen as a symbolic food of Tsukimi. One favourite way to serve eggs during the Japanese Moon Festival is to crack a raw egg into a bowl of soba or udon noodles and boiling-hot broth, just like the Tokushima Ramen.

 

 

For more on the Moon Festival celebrations across Asia, take a peek at the Mid-Autumn Festival in Thailand, or read about the popular dishes of the Moon Festival in China.

 

To celebrate the multicultural Moon Festival at home, create your own feast with Asian Inspirations’ recommended dishes – Tofu Patty with Oroshi Ponzu, Moo Sam Chun Tom Khem (Slow-cooked Pork Belly), Malaysian Satay Beef, Japchae, Pan-fried Garlic Prawns, and Pad Cha Beef). To find out more about Moon Festival celebrations and traditions all over Asia, click here.

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