Culture - Chinese

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 50339 [post_author] => 569 [post_date] => 2017-09-13 17:45:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-13 07:45:18 [post_content] => While we might be in the midst of spring in Australia, people of the Northern Hemisphere Asian countries are gearing up for the second biggest festival of the year, the Mid-Autumn Festival. Also known as the Moon Festival, this celebration takes place on the 15th day of the eighth lunar month, when the moon is said to be at its brightest and most beautiful. In 2017, the Moon Festival falls on Wednesday 4 October. The Moon Festival will be marked across Asia (with special Moon Festival events in Australia, too), but the most spectacular proceedings take place in China. Read 5 intriguing facts about the moon in Chinese culture chinese-mooncake Moon Festival activities in China
  • Gazing at the moon – at the heart of the Moon Festival celebrations is the act of worshipping and giving thanks to the moon. Gaze up to see the moon at its brightest during this time.
  • Savouring mooncakes – no Moon Festival event is complete without mooncakes. See below to find out more about these sweet and savoury cakes, which are beautifully wrapped and presented as gifts.
  • Watching the dragon dances – said to ward off bad luck and evil spirits, the vibrant dragon dances have become a colourful custom in Hong Kong and China.
  • Lighting lanterns – children in China love playing with rainbow-hued lanterns in the streets. Hold your lantern high to welcome extra good luck for the coming year.
  • Watching the tidal bore – travel to the Zhejiang Province of East China to appreciate the moon’s influence on the tides by viewing the rare phenomenon of the flood tide surges through the waterways.
  • Spend time with your family – the Mid-Autumn Festival is a time to give thanks, and that includes showing your appreciation for your family.
Read 7 ways to celebrate the Moon Festival with your family What to eat during the Moon Festival To celebrate the multicultural Moon Festival at home, create your own feast with Asian Inspirations’ recommended dishes – Tofu Patty with Oroshi Ponzu, Moo Sam Chun Tom Khem (Slow-cooked Pork Belly), Malaysian Satay Beef, Japchae, Pan-fried Garlic Prawns, and Pad Cha Beef). To find out more about Moon Festival celebrations and traditions all over Asia, click here. [post_title] => Celebrating the Chinese Moon Festival [post_excerpt] => Learn about the customs and traditions of the Moon Festival in China. The Mid-Autumn Festival is the second biggest festival in China, with celebrations centered on the moon and the family. Discover the Moon Festival activities and what to eat during the Moon Festival with Asian Inspirations. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => celebrating-the-chinese-moon-festival [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-01 13:31:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-01 02:31:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=50339 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Celebrating the Chinese Moon Festival

While we might be in the midst of spring in Australia, people of the Northern Hemisphere Asian countries are gearing up for the second biggest festival of the year, the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Also known as the Moon Festival, this celebration takes place on the 15th day of the eighth lunar month, when the moon is said to be at its brightest and most beautiful. In 2017, the Moon Festival falls on Wednesday 4 October. The Moon Festival will be marked across Asia (with special Moon Festival events in Australia, too), but the most spectacular proceedings take place in China.

Read 5 intriguing facts about the moon in Chinese culture

chinese-mooncake

Moon Festival activities in China

  • Gazing at the moon – at the heart of the Moon Festival celebrations is the act of worshipping and giving thanks to the moon. Gaze up to see the moon at its brightest during this time.
  • Savouring mooncakes – no Moon Festival event is complete without mooncakes. See below to find out more about these sweet and savoury cakes, which are beautifully wrapped and presented as gifts.
  • Watching the dragon dances – said to ward off bad luck and evil spirits, the vibrant dragon dances have become a colourful custom in Hong Kong and China.
  • Lighting lanterns – children in China love playing with rainbow-hued lanterns in the streets. Hold your lantern high to welcome extra good luck for the coming year.
  • Watching the tidal bore – travel to the Zhejiang Province of East China to appreciate the moon’s influence on the tides by viewing the rare phenomenon of the flood tide surges through the waterways.
  • Spend time with your family – the Mid-Autumn Festival is a time to give thanks, and that includes showing your appreciation for your family.

Read 7 ways to celebrate the Moon Festival with your family

What to eat during the Moon Festival

To celebrate the multicultural Moon Festival at home, create your own feast with Asian Inspirations’ recommended dishes – Tofu Patty with Oroshi Ponzu, Moo Sam Chun Tom Khem (Slow-cooked Pork Belly), Malaysian Satay Beef, Japchae, Pan-fried Garlic Prawns, and Pad Cha Beef). To find out more about Moon Festival celebrations and traditions all over Asia, click here.

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