Culture - Korean

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 37691 [post_author] => 1006 [post_date] => 2015-08-28 09:30:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-27 23:30:10 [post_content] =>

Korean food is not only known to be a healthy but is also deeply rooted in Yin and Yang principles. This is even symbolic in the prominent red and blue taegeuk symbol that is present in the middle of the South Korean flag.

These forces are both opposing and complementary; together, they govern the universe.  As it should ideally be balanced, the five elements should also be present and in balance with each other.

The five elements of Yin and Yang are associated with organs in the body and with five essential flavours, sour, bitter, sweet, spicy, and salty.

There’s more to Korean food than the quintessential Kimchi. Korean food culture believes that food and medicine originate from the same root, therefore, there is no better medicine than food.Yin and yang principles are thus ingrained in the daily lives of Koreans.

 Yin yang - 5 Ways Korean Food is Symbolic of Yin and Yang Principles

Image: Robert Bieber used under the Creative Commons Licence

Here are 5 ways Korean food is symbolic of the Yin and Yang principle: 1.  The rice that is eaten by the Koreans on a daily basis is believed to have all five element energies in it. Here’s how: It is cooked with water, in a furnace (wood and fire). The rice is steamed in the metal pot and the rice itself contains the best earth energy. By eating steamed rice, Koreans believe they receive the five elements' energy in every meal. Amazing, isn’t it?

2.  Korean dishes incorporate all five cardinal colours (blue, red, yellow, white, and black), each corresponding to the five basic elements. This ensures overall nutritional balance in every meal.

3.  The traditional Korean table is shaped round to represent the universe with four legs on the earth, while the spoon is the yin and chopsticks are the yang.

4. Kimchi is a perfect example of yin and yang food as it has both the ‘cold’ and ‘hot’ elements like cabbage and chilli peppers. Grilled meats, with their juices and their fat, are supposed to be paired with fresh greens and sharp, earthy Doenjang, or soybean paste.

5. Bibimbap represents a careful balance of colours and ingredients and anything with the concept of ‘bibim’ of ‘mixed’ at its core.

Bibimbap - Yin and Yang Principles

Image: Chloe Lim used under the Creative Commons Licence

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5 Ways Korean Food is Symbolic of Yin and Yang Principles

Korean food is not only known to be a healthy but is also deeply rooted in Yin and Yang principles. This is even symbolic in the prominent red and blue taegeuk symbol that is present in the middle of the South Korean flag.

These forces are both opposing and complementary; together, they govern the universe.  As it should ideally be balanced, the five elements should also be present and in balance with each other.

The five elements of Yin and Yang are associated with organs in the body and with five essential flavours, sour, bitter, sweet, spicy, and salty.

There’s more to Korean food than the quintessential Kimchi. Korean food culture believes that food and medicine originate from the same root, therefore, there is no better medicine than food.Yin and yang principles are thus ingrained in the daily lives of Koreans.

 Yin yang - 5 Ways Korean Food is Symbolic of Yin and Yang Principles

Image: Robert Bieber used under the Creative Commons Licence

Here are 5 ways Korean food is symbolic of the Yin and Yang principle:

1.  The rice that is eaten by the Koreans on a daily basis is believed to have all five element energies in it. Here’s how: It is cooked with water, in a furnace (wood and fire). The rice is steamed in the metal pot and the rice itself contains the best earth energy. By eating steamed rice, Koreans believe they receive the five elements’ energy in every meal. Amazing, isn’t it?

2.  Korean dishes incorporate all five cardinal colours (blue, red, yellow, white, and black), each corresponding to the five basic elements. This ensures overall nutritional balance in every meal.

3.  The traditional Korean table is shaped round to represent the universe with four legs on the earth, while the spoon is the yin and chopsticks are the yang.

4. Kimchi is a perfect example of yin and yang food as it has both the ‘cold’ and ‘hot’ elements like cabbage and chilli peppers. Grilled meats, with their juices and their fat, are supposed to be paired with fresh greens and sharp, earthy Doenjang, or soybean paste.

5. Bibimbap represents a careful balance of colours and ingredients and anything with the concept of ‘bibim’ of ‘mixed’ at its core.

Bibimbap - Yin and Yang Principles

Image: Chloe Lim used under the Creative Commons Licence

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