Culture - Thai

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 32774 [post_author] => 569 [post_date] => 2015-03-25 09:30:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-24 22:30:26 [post_content] => Travelling the world is an enlightening experience. From witnessing cultural traditions that you aren't used to and embracing the very same in a matter of seconds, to sampling unusual foods that you will never again get to taste in all their authenticity, travelling, especially through Asia, is an exhilarating experience. Thailand is a country of delightful customs and traditions. Some of them peculiar, some of them endearing. Asian Inspirations demystifies some of these interesting Thai customs. Ghostly consent: Ages ago, overnight visitors were often requested by their hosts, to ask consent from the Phra Phum (ghosts) for staying over. Before taking their leave, the visitors were also asked to thank the ghosts. Some hill tribes still follow this custom with reverence. Interesting Thai CustomsImage: Steven Depolo used under the Creative Commons Licence Unopened Gifts: While some cultures encourage an enthusiastic display of gift-opening, Thai culture takes the opposite route. In this country, it is considered rude behaviour to open the received gifts in front of the giver. An unopened gift in company of guests is said to be a mark of respect. Dining Etiquette: When eating, Thai culture norms dictate that a spoon ought not to be dipped into a bowl directly. It is to slightly touch the contents, but never scoop them up above a certain limit. Usually, noodles are eaten with chopsticks, never with spoons or forks. But on the rare occasion that spoons and forks are used, minimal quantities are lifted off the plate. Thai Customs Image: Matt DeTurck used under the Creative Commons Licence Never point a finger: Thai people get easily offended when someone points a finger at them, even if no offence is deliberately intended. So, remember never to raise a hand when you're conversing with people, especially when you're addressing monks. Paying for meals: In Thailand, the host always plays for meals. The number of guests never matters. So, if you're the guest, never fight for the bill, for it is considered bad manners. [post_title] => 5 Interesting Thai Customs [post_excerpt] => Thai culture can be a bit strange to outsiders at some point of time. This list of 5 interesting Thai customs will help you during your stay in Thailand. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 5-interesting-thai-customs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-15 12:22:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-15 01:22:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://asianinspirations.com.au/?post_type=asian-culture&p=32774 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => asian-culture [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

5 Interesting Thai Customs

Travelling the world is an enlightening experience. From witnessing cultural traditions that you aren’t used to and embracing the very same in a matter of seconds, to sampling unusual foods that you will never again get to taste in all their authenticity, travelling, especially through Asia, is an exhilarating experience.

Thailand is a country of delightful customs and traditions. Some of them peculiar, some of them endearing. Asian Inspirations demystifies some of these interesting Thai customs.

Ghostly consent: Ages ago, overnight visitors were often requested by their hosts, to ask consent from the Phra Phum (ghosts) for staying over. Before taking their leave, the visitors were also asked to thank the ghosts. Some hill tribes still follow this custom with reverence.

Interesting Thai CustomsImage: Steven Depolo used under the Creative Commons Licence

Unopened Gifts: While some cultures encourage an enthusiastic display of gift-opening, Thai culture takes the opposite route. In this country, it is considered rude behaviour to open the received gifts in front of the giver. An unopened gift in company of guests is said to be a mark of respect.

Dining Etiquette: When eating, Thai culture norms dictate that a spoon ought not to be dipped into a bowl directly. It is to slightly touch the contents, but never scoop them up above a certain limit. Usually, noodles are eaten with chopsticks, never with spoons or forks. But on the rare occasion that spoons and forks are used, minimal quantities are lifted off the plate.

Thai Customs
Image: Matt DeTurck used under the Creative Commons Licence

Never point a finger: Thai people get easily offended when someone points a finger at them, even if no offence is deliberately intended. So, remember never to raise a hand when you’re conversing with people, especially when you’re addressing monks.

Paying for meals: In Thailand, the host always plays for meals. The number of guests never matters. So, if you’re the guest, never fight for the bill, for it is considered bad manners.

You May Also Like

Budae Jjigae

Budae Jjigae

Inspirational Stories

Inspirational Stories

CNY 2016 WINNERS

Kate Brodhurst

Rosalin Kristiani

Glenda Mc Donnell

Michael J Sabo

Melinda Savage

Lisa-Jane Fudge

Lillie Giang

Justine Withers

Julia Brodska

Josephine Chan

Sally-Ann Haw

Store Locator

Find your nearest Asian Store

Search


Our Newsletter

Sign up for an authentic Asian experience. From exotic cuisines to fascinating destinations to cooking competitions and monthly giveaways - Discover the Authentic